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Canterbury College Head of Department Releases Anthem of Hope

Head of Music and Performing Arts at our Canterbury College, Ian Mollatt, has released an anthem of hope during these challenging times titled, ‘Keep the World Alive’.

Inspired by funk, jazz, soul and pop, the upbeat and catchy tune has been released on Songtradr, Spotify, Amazon Music and YouTube under Ian’s stage name, ‘Mol’.

Ian originally wrote the song with his friend Steve Lang whilst studying at University and decided to re-record it in 2019 after being diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease. Speaking about the impact of the diagnosis and how it has inspired him to revisit the track, Ian commented: “Parkinson’s has affected some of my motor skills and has impacted on some of my playing ability.

“I have been a gigging bassist for over 25 years, playing in bands including Born2B, Pulse, Jonathan Wells, K9, Spanking Llamas and Crossfire to name but a few.

“In order to focus on an area of music that I can still involve myself with fully, I have gone more into the Recording and Production aspect, starting with the re-recording of Keep the World Alive.”

In addition to writing the lyrics, Ian can be heard playing the keyboard on the track alongside fellow musicians Simon Foster (vocals), James Dean (guitar), Steve Rickwood (bass guitar), Paul Booth (saxophone), Mike West (brass) and John Humphrey (drums). Each of the musicians gave their time for free, along with John Gallen who mixed the track.

Ian, who initially wrote the song in response to the ongoing climate crisis, admits ‘The title is coincidental in terms of when this was released’, but acknowledges that the track’s message is more important now than ever, explaining: “I feel given the current situation and the state of the environment in general, we need to address this for future generations. It is important that we keep the world alive through the positive actions of current governments in addressing the global issues we face as a civilisation.”

The song was principally recorded between August 2019 and March 2020, with the final parts completed during the lockdown.

“There are three main reasons why I decided to re-record the track,” noted Ian, who continued: “To help me deal with my diagnosis with the support of my friends and work colleagues.

“To recognise that we need to work together and not be passive in ensuring that we attempt to address issues to keep the world alive.

“And to remain motivated in my passion for music.

“I remain thankful and inspired by all involved on the track and their willingness to be involved.”

To accompany the release of the track, Ian collaborated with the College’s Head of Media and Communication, Zoran Tesic, to create an inspirational and joyful music video using footage from all around the world. The video can be viewed below.